Friday, June 20, 2014

Fighting Allmoge and Midsummer



The Paul Dolstein drawing of the Danish Soldiers and the Swedish Allmoge fighting.

What can be better on The Swedish Midsummer then some staged combat pictures inspired by the Dolstein drawings and a opportunety to force some more pictures of my newly re-based Swedish allmoge on to you:)

This time they are engageing their nemesis the Danish Mercenary Soldiers and some dissmounted Danish Nobles in the middel to bolster the Mercenarys.

Now I just hope to get a game up with them, but as it is summer/vacation times it can be tought...


























26 comments:

  1. Great looking models and pics mate

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  2. Really impressive collection you've build over the years Michael! When reading up on the history of landsknechts, I saw that Dolstein claimed 1.800 Landsknechts hired by the Danish crown stuck down a force of 15.000 Swedish "allmoge" at the battle of Älvsborg in 1502. Terrible evidence to the effectiveness of the formed pike block.

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  3. Thank you matey!

    I don't realy thing that the Swedis allmoge force that lost at Älvsborg was 15000. No real historical evidence for that, just Danish/Dolstein propaganda. After the swedish crew of 140 mercenarys surendered the castle Danes, the Swedish noblemen Åke Hansson of the house of Tott Tried to take it back with his allmoge force and meet the Danish mercenarys in open battle outside Älvsborg. The Swedis allmoge force was probably around 1500-2000 soldiers, his own houshold troops and his local allmoge, and it is Told that they managed to inflict around 200 casultys for the Danes before their leader was captured and the battle was lost to the Danes :(

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  4. Very impressive indeed! Nice to see them alltogether after the massive rebasing operation :)

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  5. Wow!! A truly impressive sight!

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  6. Hi Michael, the re-basing was certainly worthwhile! They look great.

    Cheers, Simon

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  7. Now that's an awesome spectacle!

    Christopher

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  8. What a sight! Very impressive. Thanks for sharing such eye-candy. Glad midsommar!
    /Mattias

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  9. The reason these Kalmar Union battles were so destructive was due to the medieval convention of fighting until dark.

    While this was a sound practice in most of Europe, the peculiar nature of the northern summer and the lack of an identifiable sunset meant that battles in Scandinavia could continue for several days, with increased scope for casualties on both sides.

    All completely true and backed up by solid evidence.

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    Replies
    1. Interesting thought but nothing I never heard before or seen any evidence of in the swedish material i got and i got quite some... So please bring forward your source and evidence:)

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    2. Of course, it's just here... oh look, a squirrel!

      *sound of footsteps running away*

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    3. :)

      If you by any chance find the reference it would be realy interested to read about it as it is a totaly new teory for me, and its alwaya nice learn more.

      Best regards Michael

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  10. Lovely work once again and the re-basing was well worth the effort.

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  11. A truly marvellous and colourful sight Michael. Words cannot describe the brilliance of this collection

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  12. Brilliant collection and photos, they really capture the feel of Dolstein and his comrades!

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  13. This is history brought to life. Brilliant work, Michael.

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  14. Awesome spectacle
    I like these natural colors and details
    Also, a very large dose of rarely told history

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  15. Excellent work, Michael.
    A great set of pictures for Midsummer.

    cheers
    Stefan

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  16. Truly an impressive sight Michael! You really get the feel of two opposing forces clashing, as opposed to some scattered blokes on a couple of rectangles that is all too often the norm (guilty as charged!).

    I hope you had a great Midsummer's celebration with the family and didn't freeze to death in our lovely Swedish summer weather. ;)

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  17. Very, very impressive sights! Lovely figures and a lot of them. Very inspiring as always. Dean

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  18. That is such an impressive sight!
    There's nothing like a good paint job and your usual good basing job that makes a battle worth fighting.
    Regards David
    I may have drooled a little looking at this post

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  19. Very impressive Michael, that's a great sight indeed. The rebasing really has paid off.

    Steve

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